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1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 Schmul (G1.2) had two sons whose unique names, Seligmann (G1.2.1) and Calmeli (Kalonymos, G1.2.2), stand out from the crowd. By the time they had reached manhood in 1651 and 1655 respectively, their father Schmul was dead [R1862]. Both ranked among the ten most active Jewish merchants in Stühlingen. The two brothers engaged in many joint ventures, but at times they did not shy away from attacking each other physically. Calmeli was fined for dragging his brother around by his hair without good reason [R4830]. Seligmann  was under protection from 1651 to 1687 [R4443], but only two years later he was dead [R901]. Seligmann had a daughter Scheinel, married to Lemble Weyl (R1.1.1), and four sons: Boroch (G1.2.1.1), Jäcklin (G1.2.1.2), Daniel (G1.2.1.3), and Schmuli (G1.2.1.4).

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 Boroch remained in Stühlingen for only a short time. From 1690 he became a resident of Oberendingen [R934] but maintained his rights of passage and of conducting business in the Stühlingen region (Geleitgeld) [R3623]. His brother Daniel is mentioned once, Jäcklin twice; by 1683 their tracks are lost. Schmuli was named after his grandfather. He was under protection in Stühlingen from 1680 to 1717; for the first twenty years he was quite successful, but after 1700 he slowed down. At the time of his death he was destitute [R3061] and the “Holy (Burial) Society” raised objections to his burial, since he had not paid his dues over the years [R762].

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 Schmuli had three daughters and two sons. His daughter Schönele was married in Bolsheim Alsace; another daughter, Lia, was married in Sulz. His daughter Sara, after an unsuccessful engagement, chose baptism, became Karolina Antonia Hoffer, and within two years married the tanner Franz Anton Keller in Engen.33 Of his two sons, Seligman (G1.2.1.4.2) moved to Gailingen. His other son, Lang Jossel (G1.2.1.4.1), the only descendant of the original Seligmann in Stühlingen, was under protection from 1703 to 1743.

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0  

33Rosenthal, “Die Judenmission vor 200 Jahren (I).”

Page 113

Source: https://www.stuehlingen.online/Book/?page_id=1939

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